2013 DOC Spring Banquet

20130511-041059.jpg

2013 DOC Spring Banquet
At Moosilauke Ravine Lodge
On May 9th, 6:30-9pm

An honor and a pleasure to be invited and included in this gathering. Many people seem surprised when they discover I am a volunteer and did not attend Dartmouth College. I attended Lebanon High School located ‘next door’, Class of ’95 and Keene State College, Class of ’99. I was the Vice President of the Environmental Outing Club at Keene State for a couple semesters. Although, it was my upbringing on a NH farm, a walk with my grandfather to the family corner property lines when I was in elementary school, and my mother’s expectation that after school my brother and I were to go outside and play that most influenced my love of outdoor activities and nature. I also have a deep and abiding love of reading, studying history, and I am fascinated by tradition. My three favorite books are The History of Hanover, NH and Dartmouth College up to 1815, The First 75 Years of the Dartmouth Outing Club and the double compilation of Walden and Civil Disobedience.

This program and why I put so much care into is not about me or for me.  I’m returning a favor to the universe.  My ultimate mission is to see students take ownership of this program.  To see students discussing the Boundary and Corridor.  To see students engaging local community, recruiting new volunteers and educating themselves and others.  My ardent desire is for students to become stewards of the land, the trails and the history of this Upper Valley region that has, is and will profoundly effect their lives.   I’m merely laying the groundwork.  I’m simply an intermediary for greater things yet to come.

This image is a detail shot of a bandana presented to me at this banquet for my volunteer service as the DOC’s Appalachian Trail Monitor Coordinator these past three years. I feel humbled by the recognition and appreciate the gift. I’m looking forward to the rest of year three, four and five of my voluntary commitment in managing the AT Stewardship program.


Nichole Hastings
Appalachian Trail Monitor Coordinator
Dartmouth Outing Club
Robinson Hall, Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755
Email: doc.at.corridormonitors@gmail.com
DOC AT Boundary Program Schedule: http://www.dartmouth.edu/~doc/appalachiantrail/
Twitter ID: @DartmouthOuting

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Press Release: August 10, 2012

Mother Nature Speaks: August 24, 2011

And Sends Jitters Through Valley

By Sarah Brubeck and John P. Gregg
Valley News Staff Writers

Lebanon — Yesterday’s big earthquake may have been centered nearly 600 miles away in Virginia, but it shook an art gallery, sloshed standing water and rattled residents throughout the Upper Valley.

Norwich resident Nichole Hastings was visiting a friend with a third-floor studio in the AVA Gallery in downtown Lebanon yesterday when glass jewelry cases started rattling and the mirror started swinging back and forth.

“It was amazing,” said Hastings, who said it lasted between 30 and 50 seconds. “I was sitting in a chair and I just felt the building moving, and I started seeing objects around the room reacting and moving as well, like swaying.”

George Loveland was sitting in his Norwich home — the Butternut Lane Bed and Breakfast not far from Interstate 91 on a bluff overlooking the Connecticut River — when things started rocking

“There was a cyclical sound, almost like it was a wheel, but elliptical,” he said. “I looked out the window, and the water was slopping out of the birdbath. I stood up, and thought I was dizzy, but I wasn’t. The house was moving.”

Nicky Corrao felt the quake on her home on Tucker Hill Road in Thetford Center.

“I was sitting at my kitchen table eating lunch, and all of a sudden I felt my house start shaking. All my plants, the leaves were shaking back and forth, and I thought, Oh my gosh, it’s an earthquake,” said Corrao, who went outside as a precaution.

Tim Savage, a sales representative at Young’s Propane in Springfield, Vt., said he and several office mates felt the temblor at Springfield Plaza, and it reminded him of an amusement park ride.

“They told me to sit down. The whole chair was shaking back and forth,” he said. “There was a rumbling — it felt like being on a ride at Six Flags.”

Over in Canaan, Andrew Musz said he watched as the plants in his office, which is in the old post office building, swayed back and forth for several seconds. Once the wooden building stopped moving, he quickly went online to see what happened.

“It felt like we had a really strong gust of wind,” Musz said. “If it would have continued, it would have been nauseating.”

Officials in Hartford, Lebanon and Hanover didn’t receive any calls reporting damage, but it was felt at Centerra office and shopping park, the Dartmouth College campus and in the five-story main building of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center.

“There was no damage, no evacuations, no disruptions in service, but people did feel and report the shaking,” said DHMC spokesman Rick Adams.

Eric Hartling, owner of Tuckerbox in White River Junction, had just finished serving the lunch hour crowd when he felt the quake in the cafe’s basement. He saw the lights hanging from the ceiling swing back and forth and noticed his coffee cup move.

“It got a little stronger and a little longer,” Hartling said. “It lasted about 30 seconds, which was long enough for me to grab my keys and phone and say ‘I’m out of this basement.’ ”

When Hartling went upstairs, he asked his employees if they felt the building shake, but nobody had. Others accused him of being crazy or drinking too much coffee that morning.

In Claremont, Rae Schmertz was sitting at a table in the library of Stevens High School with a few other teachers when the table began to shake. At first she thought someone was just kicking the table. Pretty soon, she was swaying in her chair.

“It was gentle but significant. It was a gradual build and then it subsided,” said Schmertz, a Lebanon resident.

Down at the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant in Vernon, Vt., Entergy spokesman Larry Smith said the plant was “unaffected by the earthquake.”

“The plant’s seismic monitor did not have any indication. The plant continues to operate normally,” Smith said in an email.

John P. Gregg can be reached at jgregg@vnews.com. Sarah Brubeck can be reached at sbrubeck@vnews.com.

*

Reference:

Valley News: And Sends Jitters Through Valley

 

Discover the D.O.C. A.T. Boundary Program

Introduction

to the

Dartmouth Outing Club’s

Appalachian Trail Boundary Program


Do you like to hike?  Are you interested in volunteering your time for a greater good?  Or a local summer escape into Nature with some ‘treasure hunting’?
You may want to consider volunteering to be an Appalachian Trail Corridor Monitor for the Dartmouth Outing Club’s Appalachian Trail Boundary Program.
Please join us at an introductory presentation and learn more about it and how to get involved and volunteer as a D.O.C. A.T. Corridor Monitor.

Date:  April 22, 2011 / April 27, 2011 / May 14, 2011

Time:  9:00 a.m. to 11/11:30 a.m.

Registration: pre-register, e-mail Nichole, limited space, no fee

Location:  Robinson Hall, Dartmouth College


Agenda

9:00 to 10:00 a.m.

The Boundary Program Presentation

In this presentation you will learn about how the program operates, the roles, responsibilities and expectations of a volunteer Corridor Monitor for the D.O.C. and A.T.C..

10:00 to 11/11:30 a.m.

A Walk on the Boundary

We will take the presentation on a walk from Robinson Hall to the A.T. Boundary, located near the Chase Field, behind the Co-op Food Store in Hanover, NH.

11/11:30 a.m. to ———-

Conclusion at the Canoe Club (optional)

When we conclude our field presentation, we will walk back and those who are interested may join us for further discussion over coffee.


 
 


What is the ‘Corridor’ and ‘Boundary’?
The Corridor is what we call the tracts of land on either side of the Appalachian Trail.  The Boundary is the yellow blazed ‘line’ delineating the separation of our Federal/State/National Park land from privately owned property.

What is a Corridor Monitor?
They are the dedicated volunteers who hike that ‘line’ monitoring and maintaining the Boundary.

Why monitor and maintain the Boundary?
To monitor and protect the Boundary and Corridor from encroachments such as hunting, timber harvesting and ATV use.


Schedule

April 2011

THURSDAY

21

FRIDAY

22

SATURDAY

23

9:00 a.m. to 11/11:30 a.m.

An Introduction to

the Dartmouth Outing Club’s Appalachian Trail Boundary Program

May 2011

FRIDAY

21

SATURDAY

22

SUNDAY

23

9:00 a.m. to 11/11:30 a.m.

An Introduction to

the Dartmouth Outing Club’s Appalachian Trail Boundary Program

June 2011

FRIDAY

10

SATURDAY

11

SUNDAY

12

MONDAY

13

TBA TBA

July 2011

MONDAY

4

TUESDAY

5

WEDNESDAY

6

THURSDAY

7

FRIDAY

8

SATURDAY

9

SUNDAY

10

 X  X

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

TBA

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA

 X  X

To become a Corridor Monitor or find out more about the D.O.C. Boundary Program, please contact Nichole Hastings at: nichole.l.hastings@gmail.com

Journal Entry: Measure for Measure – Act 3

I returned from the meeting with the two Hanover police officers with a great sense of sadness and melancholy. I herald and champion truth, compassion, understanding, ownership, civic duty and open-minded communication, yet not one of these prevailed this evening. The officers, who’s identities I had not even known, until this very evening, sat unyielding, unmoved and unrepentent.

They adamantly refused to acknowledge that there could be some understanding or new knowledge to be gleaned. They steadfastly refused to admit they falsified their report, putting untrue words in my mouth and in their account of the situation. The one officer, a man of 38-years denied, denied quite emphatically that he had said, “She’s nobody.” to a bystander who asked me my name. Who could forget a statement like that? I’ll remember it and the circumstances under which it was said until the day I die.

I went through the report, pointing out every inconsistency and falsehood. I spoke of the fork in the road, to just shrug and forget the trauma, or to press charges of which I have witnesses and an illegal act stated in the report by their own admission. I explained the third tine. My efforts were wasted.

The bystander, who had inquired my name, also witnessed that same officer threaten to ‘spray’ me. I was unaware that these are the tactics that can be applied to a person taken into ‘protective custody’. I stated, “I did not once feel ‘protected’ but threatened and assaulted.” All my words fell on deaf ears.

The ‘older’ and ‘more experienced’ officer rolled his eyes, berated me for interupting him and then spoke over me several times unashamedly. The other officer, clearly reluctant to speak of his own accord, could not or maybe did not know how, to have a voice of his own. He simply parroted the words of the other.

It fills me with fear for others, who may encounter these two, when they are on duty together. They will believe and act upon hearsay, go in ‘guns shooting’, then refuse to realize, they never bothered to ask any questions. They will create their own story, add in details to justify the ends to their means. They will never ever admit they ever did anything wrong, made a mistake, because to do so would mean they would have to apologize. And it became clear to me, that as officers of the so-called law, and as the brash officer had stated in the police vehicle to me, “We can do whatever we want when you are in our custody.”

My heart is sad for these two. I feel a great sorrow and sympathy for their souls. I wonder how they will treat their next ‘victim’ and I ardently hope it is without anger from this meeting. I worry that this fear, will come to be. I wonder if they realize, I was giving them every opportunity to do the right thing, and at the very least, apologize. I am assured, in spite of my warning at the beginning of the conversation, the officers will not think beyond, nor take anything I said as it was meant…sound advice and a sign.

I asked for three things, understanding of the difference between an anxiety attack and intoxication, so as to prevent mistaking one for the other. I asked the false statement they claimed I had made, to be rescinded and struck from the report. I asked an apology for their ‘nobody’ statement, for to say such a thing is to deny I am a human being on this planet, a citizen of this country, having a name and deserving of respect.

I pity them. I pity them the circumstances that have made them this way. I pity the path they are choosing and their lot, for simply put…their ‘reasoning is of common clay’.

Journal Entry: Measure for Measure Act 2

I went to the Hanover police station to obtain a copy of the police report as advised by several lawyers. A fee is involved. I laugh about it’s absurdity. It’s a public record and yet, to have a copy costs you.
I fill out the paperwork and pay the fee. I ask if the Chief of Police is in and am invited to sit in his office to speak with him.
I will not recount the conversation. I will say, I have a great deal of respect for this man. I appreciate the time he took to sit and talk with me, even our agreement that we may never agree on several points.
He asked questions, listened, spoke his mind and let me return it in kind. He proposed a meeting with the two officers to discuss the inaccuracies of that evening and to address them.
We promised each other nothing, in regards to the outcome of such a meeting. We shook hands, smiled, and he walked me to the door.

Journal Entry: July 2, 2010

Yesterday, my friend Maidie and I went to the Co-op in Hanover, New Hampshire to grocery shop.  After we were done, we drove the car to behind the gas station next door to eat the lunches that we had purchased.  There’s a short grassed road running along-side a field, we pull into it and park at the head.  We get out, planning to lunch on the corner of the grassy field.  I see in the distance, at the end of the grass road, a trail sign.  Maidie has walked over and sat down on the field and I head towards her.

There is a small sign planted on the edge and it warns of pesticides.  The field has been treated in the last 48 hours it describes.  We quickly remove ourselves and head over to the picnic table across the parking lot, on the backside of the gas station.  A pleasant couple says, ‘hello’ as they get up from the table to throw their lunch trash away.  We sit down.

Lunch is sushi and a banana.  This is my last time eating fish or seafood.  I have decided to go back to being a vegetarian so I savor each bite.  Maidie and I chat about this and that.  I’m feeling melancholy as she will be moving away soon.  This will be one of our last meals together.

We finish eating and she offers to throw all the lunch trash away.  My curiosity has finally gotten the best of me and I run down the dirt road to read the sign.  Indeed, it is a trail sign.  I see the familiar Appalachian Trail marking and the white blazes on the trees.  I can hardly contain my excitement and I quickly break out pen and paper.  I jot down a brief note saying, “Lakeshore friends, please go to the Dartmouth Outing Club on campus and read the Register.  Girl with Dog.”